These Glasses Could Change The Way Color Blind People See The World

[Source: Inquisitr]
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A new brand of glasses claims it can help correct some types of mild color blindness, but do they really work? EnChroma, the company that makes these color-correcting glasses, could change the way color-blind people see the world. Red-green color blindness, or “deuteranopia,” is the most common type and is estimated to affect about six percent of males.

If you’re color blind or know someone who is, you realize while it’s not a debilitating condition, it could be nice to see as everyone else does once in a while. Priced at $340 to $440 with non-prescription lenses, they are pretty expensive. While seeing a wider range of colors can be exciting, it may not be “life-changing” to everyone. Regardless, they are pretty cool.

EnChroma Co-Founder & Vice president of Products Donald McPherson, PhD and glass scientist, says, “In the simplest explanation, EnChroma’s glasses work by re-establishing the correct balance between signals from the three photopigments in the eye of the color deficient. … The eyewear does this by removing small slices of light from the visible spectra. At the cortical level, the neural machinery is intact and perfectly functioning in the color blind, so once the correct ratios entering the eye are re-established, the neural mechanisms excite and the correct color can be seen and perceived,” he explains further.

Essentially, Dr. McPherson is saying his company’s glasses alter the way light is filtered as it enters the eye and corrects the way color-blind people perceive light—therefore, the way they see color.

Sources say while the glasses do seem to increase the vibrancy of colors (especially the color red), they are still something of a luxury item and may not be worthwhile to everyone. Either way, they are still rather intriguing, don’t you think?

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